Workaholic who manages an art gallery and performance space as well as a new concert venue in Minneapolis. In my spare time from that I play in a band. I also love metal casting and am finishing my majors at the U of M in sculpture and art history this fall. These are my notes about being and having blinding ambition and a overwhelming drive to do as much as I can. Along the way I see some interesting things and partake in some random events.

10th January 2013

Post

Beer Popovers

http://www.craftbeer.com/recipes/breakfast-beer-popovers

5th December 2012

Video with 1 note

RIP Dave Brubeck

21st October 2012

Photo reblogged from Stuff about Minneapolis with 237 notes

stuffaboutminneapolis:

Dogs Crap Here via North Talk Facebook page

stuffaboutminneapolis:

Dogs Crap Here via North Talk Facebook page

4th October 2012

Post with 2 notes

easy pad thai

Easy Pad Thai

(adapted from Everyday Food)

Serves 4

8 ounces dried, wide and flat rice noodles
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus wedges for serving
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 squirt (about 1/8 teaspoon) Sriracha (optional)
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3 scallions (green onions), white and green parts, separated and thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, minced
2 large eggs, light beaten (optional)
1/2 cup fresh cilantro
1/4 cup chopped roasted, salted peanuts

  1. Soak noodles according to package instructions. Drain.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together brown sugar, lime juice, soy sauce, and Sriracha.
  3. In a large nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat.
  4. Add scallion whites and garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant (about 30 seconds). Add eggs and cook, scraping skillet with spatula until eggs are almost set (about 30 seconds). Transfer eggs to a plate.
  5. Add noodles, scallion greens, and sauce to skillet. Cook, tossing constantly, until noodles are soft (about 1 minute). Add egg mixture and toss to coat, breaking eggs up gently.
  6. Serve noodles with lime wedges, topped with cilantro and peanuts.

4th October 2012

Post

dip

Recipe:  Jalapeno Popper Dip

6-8 slices of bacon, diced and cooked crispy
2 8-oz packages of cream cheese, soft
1 cup of mayonnaise
4-6 jalapeno’s, chopped and deseeded.  The seeds will make it fiery hot.
1 cup of cheddar cheese, shredded
1/2 cup of mozzarella cheese, shredded
1/4 cup diced green onion
Topping:
1 cup of crushed crackers ( I used Ritz)
1/2 cup parmesan cheese
1/2 stick of butter, melted
Preheat oven to 350.
Combine all of the ingredients into a medium bowl.  Stir well.
Transfer to an oven proof dish. The size of the dish depends on how thick the dip is.  

27th September 2012

Photoset reblogged from Fuck Yeah Illustrative Art! with 5,154 notes

devidsketchbook:

AMAZING SERIES OF ARTWORK BY MICHAEL REEDY

Michael Reedy was born in Galesburg, Illinois. He received a BFA in Drawing from North Central College, a MFA in Painting from Northern Illinois University. He began teaching at EMU in 2005. Portraiture is central to his artistic studies and has been for the past twelve years, he says. Reedy identifies a particular interest in depictions of the human body that fall outside the canon of art history, such as cartooning and medical illustration.

Tagged: art

Source: devidsketchbook.com

26th September 2012

Photo reblogged from Eupraxsophy with 961 notes

eupraxsophy:

Some scientists suspect that Vincent van Gogh was autistic, and this painting, Starry Night, is one reason. The swirling and stormy skies you see here (as well as in his other paintings) seem to fit the precise mathematical formula for turbulence known as the Kolmogorov scaling - which was devised 50 years after the painter’s death.
Autistic individuals are known to naturally grasp such concepts in lieu of verbal and social interactions (which van Gogh was known for lacking). So while it’s hardly written in stone, it’s a possibility. It’s also probable that his psychotic episodes, which included hallucinations, allowed him the ability to capture these things naturally.

eupraxsophy:

Some scientists suspect that Vincent van Gogh was autistic, and this painting, Starry Night, is one reason. The swirling and stormy skies you see here (as well as in his other paintings) seem to fit the precise mathematical formula for turbulence known as the Kolmogorov scaling - which was devised 50 years after the painter’s death.

Autistic individuals are known to naturally grasp such concepts in lieu of verbal and social interactions (which van Gogh was known for lacking). So while it’s hardly written in stone, it’s a possibility. It’s also probable that his psychotic episodes, which included hallucinations, allowed him the ability to capture these things naturally.

21st September 2012

Link

Cute →

18th September 2012

Link

Doctor who fans →

12th September 2012

Photoset reblogged from UnicornHatParty: Kids Crafts for Everyone with 703 notes

rainbowsandunicornscrafts:

DIY Two Ingredient Glitter Slime Recipe from The 36 Avenue here.